Last edited by Faektilar
Thursday, November 26, 2020 | History

2 edition of Medicinal plants used by the Cree Indians, Hudson Bay Territory found in the catalog.

Medicinal plants used by the Cree Indians, Hudson Bay Territory

E.M Holmes

Medicinal plants used by the Cree Indians, Hudson Bay Territory

  • 46 Want to read
  • 4 Currently reading

Published by s.n in S.l .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Indians of North America -- Medicine,
  • Cree Indians -- Medicine

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby E.M. Holmes
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsE"98"M4"H65
    The Physical Object
    PaginationP. 302-304
    Number of Pages304
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL21136382M


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Medicinal plants used by the Cree Indians, Hudson Bay Territory by E.M Holmes Download PDF EPUB FB2

An account of the medicinal uses of this plant by the Indians of the North of Michigan will be found in the Pharm. Journ., [3], viii, p. By homoeopaths it is used as a remedy for tender feet, especially when associated with rheumatism, and the tincture is highly.

Traditionally, the southern limits of the Cree territory in Montana were the Missouri River and the Milk River. First contact. In Manitoba, the Cree were first contacted by Europeans inat the mouth of the Nelson and Hayes rivers by a Hudson's Bay Company (HBC) party traveling about miles ( km) inland.

In the south, contact was a: 95, Kalmia latifolia, commonly called mountain laurel, calico-bush, or spoonwood, is a broadleaved evergreen shrub in the heather family, Ericaceae, that is native to the eastern United range stretches from southern Maine south to northern Florida, and west to Indiana and in laurel is the state flower of Connecticut and : Ericaceae.

medicinal plants in the boreal forest of Canada: Review and perspectives. Holmes EM: Medicinal plants used by Cree Indians, Hudson's Bay territory. Pharm J TransactionsMateria medica: Pharmacy and therapeutics of the Cree Indians of the Hudson Bay territory.

Paul Med JJenkins WH: Notes on. A total of medicinal plant taxa used by the Aboriginal people of the Canadian boreal forest were reported in the reviewed literature.

These plants were used to treat 28 disease and disorder categories, with the highest number of species being used for gastro-intestinal disorders, followed by musculoskeletal disorders. E. HolmesMedicinal plants used by the Cree Indians. Pharmaceutical Journal and Transactions, 3 (15) (), pp.

Google Scholar. StrathMateria medica, pharmacy and therapeutics of the Cree Indians of the Hudson Bay territory. The St. Paul Medical Journal, 5 (), pp.

Google Scholar. WHO, WHO, Technical. This plant can be used for multiple medicinal remedies, but it is one of the only plants that the healers used in treating eye problems. A decoction from sumac was used as a gargle to relieve sore throats or taken as a remedy for diarrhea. The leaves and berries were combined in tea to reduce fever or made into a poultice to soothe poison ivy.

settlers used some of the plants that were available to them. Native American Indians used plants for food, shelter, medicine, ceremonies, and clothing. Many of the plants highlighted had multiple uses. Medicinal plants used by the Cree Indians Many chemicals that can be found in these plants were used as medicine but if used in a high or large dose could become toxic or poisonous.

Some. Milky Substance from Breaking the Plant. When broken, sumac releases a milky substance. This contains large quantities of tannic acid, and was used to create a medicinal wine. This substance has also been used Medicinal plants used by the Cree Indians a salve on wounds.

Feverfew. A perennial in the daisy family, feverfew plants. Sweet flag is used as a medicinal plant by First Nation people. Also known locally as "ratroot", it is an all-round panacea for many complaints. The dried root is used by Ojibway in southeastern Manitoba to treat high cholesterol, and in combination with White Water Lily(Nymphaea odorata) to treat diabetes.

(Holmes, E.M.,Medicinal Plants Used by Cree Indians, Hudson's Bay Territory, The Pharmaceutical Journal and Transactionspages ) Hawaiian Drug, Antirheumatic (External) detail. Bitter tannins from acorns, bark, and insect galls on oaks were used to treat a variety of ailments including open wounds, bladder problems, and intermittent fevers.

For an extensive discussion of medicinal uses of native plants, see "Plants Used by the Indians of Mendocino County California" by V.K.

Chesnut, listed below under References. Milkweed A number of Native tribes have used the latex juice from the milkweed roots, plant tops, and stem for medicinal purposes. The Miwok people used the latex to remove warts. The Cheyenne made a decoction of the dried plant tops and used it as an eyewash to heal snow blindness.

Cree, Hudson Bay - Drug, Tonic Use documented by: Holmes, E.M.,Medicinal Plants Used by Cree Indians, Hudson's Bay Territory, The Pharmaceutical Journal and Transactionspage View all documented uses for Kalmia angustifolia L. Other tribes may have used them too, of course. Medicinal Plants.

and. Medicinal Plants NOT in Indian Territory. The first is a compilation of plants used by the Five Tribes I found in the sources below. The second list was a bear to create and is still a work in progress.

(A big thanks to my diligent research assistant, Felicia Mitchell!). Cree, Hudson Bay Drug, Cold Remedy Decoction of bark taken as an emetic for colds. Holmes, E.M.,Medicinal Plants Used by Cree Indians, Hudson's Bay Territory, The Pharmaceutical Journal and Transactionspage Cornus sericea L.

Redosier Dogwood USDA COSES: Cree, Hudson Bay Drug, Cough Medicine. Cree, Hudson Bay Drug, Emetic Plant used as an emetic. Holmes, E.M.,Medicinal Plants Used by Cree Indians, Hudson's Bay Territory, The Pharmaceutical Journal and Transactionspage Lobelia kalmii L. Ontario Lobelia USDA LOKA: Iroquois Drug, Dermatological Aid Infusion of smashed plants used as drops for abscesses.

Today plants are still used by the pharmaceutical industry. Approximately 25% of prescriptions written in the US are plant derived. China leads the world in medicinal plant usage by incorporating it in there modern health care system. Herbal medicine is still relied.

A Reference Guide to Medicinal Plants: Herbal Medicine Past and Present by John Crellin and Jane Philpott. Based on the teachings of southern folk herbalist Tommie Bass, this guide is a treasury of old-timey herbal wisdom and little-used local medicinals.

Featuring over seven hundred plants, the book blends folk wisdom with modern scientific. medicinal plants. Medicinal plants naturally synthesize and accumulate some secondary metabolites, like alkaloids, sterols, terpenes, flavonoids, saponins, glycosides, cyanogeniCS, tannins, resins.

lactones, quinines, volatile Oils etc. The medicinal plants have been used for treatment Of illnesses and diseases, since the dawn of time.

Medicinal Plants. Did you know that plants are a major source of drug compounds. Approximately one-quarter of all prescription drugs contain an ingredient derived from a flowering plant. For example, digitalis, used in cardiac care, was derived from the ornamental flower Foxglove.

A powerful anticancer agent for breast cancer has been found in. Strath R. Materia medica: Pharmacy and therapeutics of the Cree Indians of the Hudson Bay territory. St Paul Med J. – Jenkins WH. Notes on the hunting economy of the Abitibi Indians. Catholic University of America.

Anthropological Series. ; – Beardsley G. Notes on Cree medicines, based on a collection made by I. Plants Used by the Indians of Mendocino County, California () - Kindle edition by Chesnut, Victor King. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets.

Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Plants Used by the Indians of Mendocino County, California ().Reviews: 6. More Buying Choices $ (9 used & new offers) Pretty Tough Plants: Resilient, Water-Smart Choices for a Beautiful Garden by Plant Select | May 3, ^ Holmes, E.M.

Medicinal Plants Used by Cree Indians, Hudson's Bay Territory. The Pharmaceutical Journal and Transactions (p. ) ^ Leighton, Anna L. Wild Plant Use by the Woods Cree (Nihithawak) of East-Central Saskatchewan. Ottawa. Bloodroot – Officially known as Sanguinaria Canadensis, it has also been called bloodwort, red puccoon root, Indian plant, pauson, and nous to the hardwood forests of the eastern part of North America, the roots of the flowering plant have long been used in Native American medicinal remedies to treat respiratory and digestive problems, diphtheria, sore throat, bronchial.

Of these, 39 plants were found to be used by both tribes for different treatment purposes. In contrast, only 15 plants where used by both tribes for similar treatments.

The small number of shared use of plants indicates the newly formed Seminole tribe developed new cultural and medicinal practices. These findings indicate that the plants used for.

Indian Herbalogy of North America: The Definitive Guide to Native Medicinal Plants and Their Uses - Kindle edition by Hutchens, Alma R. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Indian Herbalogy of North America: The Definitive Guide to Native Medicinal Plants and Their s: The Cree also used many of the forest™s plants for medicinal or ceremonial practices.

Teas made from Labrador, black currant, raspberries, and mint helped a wide variety of ailments and provided vital nutrients to their simple diet.

Unlike the Plains Cree, the Woodland Cree did. Excellent review of most aspects of medicinal plants encompassing so many facts that are not easy to access. However, the perspective is entirely from an orthodox scientific (reductionist) point of view, which makes the arguments regarding traditional use of herbal medicine a bit strained.

The view on life as a blind struggle for survival is a Reviews: ^ Hamel, Paul B. and Mary U. Chiltoskey Cherokee Plants and Their Uses – A Year History. Sylva, N.C.

Herald Publishing Co. 42) ^ Holmes, E.M. Medicinal Plants Used by Cree Indians, Hudson's Bay Territory. The Pharmaceutical Journal and Transactions – (p.

- Explore sparkresearch's board "Indian Culture" on Pinterest. See more ideas about Native american indians, Native american history, Native american pins. ↑ Holmes, E.M. Medicinal Plants Used by Cree Indians, Hudson's Bay Territory. The Pharmaceutical Journal and Transactions (p. ) ↑ Romero, John Bruno The Botanical Lore of the California Indians.

New York. Vantage Press, Inc. 52). Evening Primrose – Officially known as Oenothera and Onagraceae, this is a genus of about species of flowering plants that are native to North and South commonly known as Suncups or Sundrops, it has long been used as both a food and in medicinal remedies.

The young roots, which have a peppery flavor, can be eaten like a vegetable, and the shoots in a salad. He explores the sacred dimension of plant and human interactions--a territory where humans experience communications from plants as expressions of Spirit.

For each healing plant described in the book, he presents medicinal uses, preparatory guidelines, and ceremonial elements such as prayers and medicine songs associated with the use of the plant. COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

Maca – Officially known as Lepidium Meyenii, this plant is native to the high Andes of Peru and has been harvested and used by humans for centuries, consumed as a food and for medicinal purposes.

It is also known as “Peruvian Ginseng,” despite the fact that it is not a member of the Ginseng family, but, because of its reputation for increasing strength, stamina, energy, libido.